Daily Archives: April 24, 2014

Upheld for Destruction by the Word of His Power

airō

high-def-space-sun-earth-wallpaper

Consider the power and majesty of Jesus Christ, even in the destruction of sinners. We read in Hebrews 1:3 that Jesus upholds “all things by the word of His power”. Whether stars or planets, lillies or lions, oceans or snow flakes, gasses or stones, angels or demons, or humans, the Lord Jesus Christ holds it all together by His word.

Would this also not include the eternal order, whereby He has given His vessels of mercy, who have believed on Him, glorified bodies to worship Him forever; and also those vessels of destruction, who have denied Him, bodies who will suffer the eternal wrath of the Lamb for their rebellion and rejection of their King? Will Jesus Christ not fit each vessel for eternity, the one for everlasting glory, and the other for everlasting damnation? Will Jesus Christ not still hold by the word of His power His beloved saints…

View original post 120 more words

Jars of Clay, Feet of Clay: The Marketing of Pseudo-Faith

Zwinglius Redivivus

First, my operating premise:

Christian rock bands are comprised of people who aren’t talented enough to make it in pop music so they market themselves as Christians and garner an audience thereby (since many Christians are happy to have some entertainment associated with themselves).

That premise has borne itself out in the recent ‘Jars of Clay’ lead singer’s joyful announcement that the Christianity he grew up with no longer matters to him. Instead, he’s adopted the pseudo-faith of modernity. This is to be expected as such persons normally stick their finger in the wind and then decide their ‘ethical’ position. And then they market themselves along those lines believing that it will help them be accepted and therefore be enriched.

In other words, Mr Jars of Clay is accomodating himself to the cultural winds. I have zero respect for such persons.

… when Jars of Clay frontman Dan Haseltine…

View original post 262 more words

Sola Sisters: Et tu, Jars of Clay?

 

Posted by Christine Pack

“Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor homosexuals, nor thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God. Such were some of you; but you were washed, but you were sanctified, but you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God.” (1 Corinthians 6:9-11)

It used to be that professing Christians, even the more liberal ones, knew that unrepentant sin was not okay. But no longer. In today’s finger-in-the-air, blow-with-the-trends evangelicalism, it seems that those who call themselves “Christian” today must be stopped at the gate for a definition-of-terms check.  Jesus as the Son of God? Check. The substitutionary atonement as payment for sins? Check. Jesus raised from the dead as proof of his satisfactory work? Check. A pass on homosexual sin in the name of ultra-tolerant love? Not so fast, buster.

Which brings me to my subject for today. The lead singer of one of my all time favorite Christian singing groups, Jars of Clay, recently began tweeting out his support for same sex marriage, and then expressed dismay that other Christians would challenge him on this, while claiming that the Bible has nothing to say on the matter of morality.

Read more

Jars of Clay Lead Singer Supports Gay Marriage

5 Pt. Salt

I just don’t see a negative effect to allowing gay marriage. No societal breakdown, no war on traditional marriage. – Dan Haseltine, lead singer of the band Jars of Clay.

Youth pastors, and those of you who support and promote contemporary “Christian” music – what are you thinking?

Here is a perfect example of an unbeliever – pretending to be Christian, and making money at it – while rejecting the Word of God altogether.

This boy is not a Christian.

Wolf.

Read more here.

View original post

Who are the false teachers?

 

snake

The whole concept of false teachers and false teaching is one that makes many Christians squirm. We don’t like to think about the idea that there are people who are actively trying to deceive believers, to turn them away from the truth of the Christian faith. But all one has to do is look around at a Christian bookstore and you can see it—deception is present.

So who are they?

Anytime someone writes on this topic, it’s tempting to name names. Tim Challies has been profiling a number of them over the last several weeks, for example, looking at false teachers throughout history and up to our present day. Making the cut are luminaries such as Benny Hinn, Joseph Smith, Ellen G. White, Pelagius, Arius… even the Pope made the cut!

Trying to make a list can be a double-edged sword. One danger is becoming too narrow, letting a secondary issue take precedence and become the measure of orthodoxy (think: egalitarianism vs complementarianism, or Calvinism vs Arminianism). A second is being too open, lacking any firm criteria upon which to make a judgement about orthodoxy whatsoever.

And it’s this error that I want to challenge in particular. When you start to examine the nature of false teaching, it tends to consistently focus on three primary areas:

Read more

But What About Gluttony!?!

 

Why do conservative Christians make such a fuss about homosexuality and give everyone a free pass—most notably themselves—when it comes to gluttony?

That’s a question you hear a lot of us these days and one you should expect to hear again and again, posed in a hundred different ways, in the years ahead.

Why are we asking about gays in heaven when we should be asking if there will be fat people in heaven? How can we say “their” sin of homosexuality is terrible while “our” sin of gluttony is no big deal? Everyone’s a biblical literalist until you bring up gluttony. Besides, the Bible contains three times as many exhortations against gluttony than against homosexuality.

How should Christians think about these claims? Well, the operative word in that question is “think.” We can’t settle for gotcha headlines and arguments that are more slogan than substance. We have to be open to reason, open our Bibles, and think this through

Read more

Youth-Driven Culture

The subtle and not-so-subtle pulls of the idolization of youth manifest themselves in three areas. The first is an elevation of youth over the aged. This reverses the biblical paradigm. The second is a view of being human that values prettiness (not to be confused with beauty and aesthetics), strength, and human achievement. Think of the captain of the cheerleading squad and the star quarterback. The third is the dominance of the market by the youth demographic. That is to say, in order to be relevant and successful, one must appeal to the youth or to youthful tastes. These manifestations of our youth-driven culture deserve a closer look.

Read more

The Real Problem With Female Masturbation

It’s refreshing to finally hear women talking about female masturbation. Given the social stigma around the topic, it can be difficult just to bring it up.

Unfortunately, too often the conversation doesn’t overcome the unhelpful stereotypes about the female sex drive…or lack thereof. Time and time again, Christian leaders explain that women masturbate because they want to “fill a void” or have “attachment issues.” These emotional generalizations fail to get at the real problem.

Read more

Center Church and common grace

 

Center Church is Timothy Keller’s text book for pastors. It is Keller’s goal that this book be used to help pastors “maximize their fruitfulness for the sake of the gospel,” and there is no doubt that this book will have a lasting impact on evangelicalism.

And there is much that is helpful in Center Church (CC). Yesterday I summarized the book, and you should really read today’s post in light of that. And I noted that there are three major areas of disagreement that I have with the approach to pastoral ministry presented in CC:

  • Contextualization—this immediately shapes our view on the methods of evangelism and equipping, how the church is built, who gets the credit for building the church, and how we evaluate ministry efforts
  • Common Grace—this immediately shapes our view on the cultural mandate of the church and the goal of the church in the world
  • The Church—the definition of who makes up the church has an immediate impact on how the gospel is manifested to the world

Today’s post will focus on that second point:

CC and Common Grace

Read more

%d bloggers like this: