Daily Archives: October 13, 2018

OCTOBER 13 THE REALITIES OF HEAVEN

Let not your heart be troubled…I go to prepare a place for you.

John 14:1–2

Much of the secularism and rationalism of our times dismisses the Christian view and teaching about heaven as “nothing more than hopeful thinking.”

But the Christian’s promised hope of future blessedness is founded upon the fullest and plainest revelations of the Old and New Testaments. That it accords with the most sacred yearnings of the human breast does not weaken it, but serves rather to confirm the truth of it, because the One who made the heart might be expected also to make provision for the fulfillment of its deepest longings.

God’s promises are made to the Christian believer, who generally has difficulty picturing himself as inheriting such bliss as the Scriptures describe. The reason is not hard to discover, for the most godly Christian is the one who knows himself best, and no one who knows himself will believe that he deserves anything better than hell. But even justice is on his side, for it is written, “If we confess our sins, [God] is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:9).

Dear Lord, thank You that so many of Your promises in Scripture have already come true—especially the advent of Your Son, Jesus. You are a faithful, holy God in whom there is no guile or deceit. Your promise of heaven is just as real as the promise of a Savior. Bless You![1]


[1] Tozer, A. W. (2015). Mornings with tozer: daily devotional readings. Chicago, IL: Moody Publishers.

OCTOBER 13 AS MUCH LIKE GOD AS POSSIBLE

But it shall not be so among you: but whosoever will be great among you, let him be your minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.

—Matthew 20:26-27

From these words we may properly conclude (and the context strongly supports the conclusion) that there is nothing wrong with the desire to be great provided (1) we seek the right kind of greatness; (2) we allow God to decide what is greatness; (3) we are willing to pay the full price that greatness demands; and (4) we are content to wait for the judgment of God to settle the whole matter of who is great at last….

No one whose heart has had a vision of God, however brief or imperfect that vision may have been, will ever consent to think of himself or anyone else as being great. The sight of God, when He appears in awesome majesty to the wondering eyes of the soul, will bring the worshiper to his knees … and fill him with such an overwhelming sense of divine greatness that he must spontaneously cry “Only God is great!” …

Obviously there are two kinds of greatness recognized in the Scriptures—an absolute, uncreated greatness belonging to God alone, and a relative and finite greatness achieved by or bestowed upon certain friends of God… who by obedience and self-denial sought to become as much like God as possible. BAM048-049

Lord, help me to emulate You, the model of true greatness, today. Amen. [1]


[1] Tozer, A. W., & Eggert, R. (2015). Tozer on the almighty god: a 365-day devotional. Chicago, IL: Moody Publishers.

What’s behind the epidemic of false rape accusations on campus?

WINTERY KNIGHT

College students puking in toilet College students puking in toilet

Heather McDonald is concerned about the feminist left’s effort to undermine the presumption of innocence for men accused of rape. She makes an argument in the prestigious City Journal that there is actually a reason why we should not believe women’s rape claims, especially in an age of feminism, until we have the evidence that proves that the man being accused is guilty.

First, she gives an example of the fake rape charge made by the Columbia University student Emma Sulkowicz. I’ll omit the history of consent before, during, and after the sex and go straight to the reason for the false accusation:

It wasn’t until eight months after their August 2012 coupling that Sulkowicz filed a campus-rape charge, alleging that Nungesser had anally raped her while she struggled and told him to stop. She claims that she waited so long to file so as…

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Representative Jim Jordan Discusses UniParty Strategy to Run Out The Clock… — The Last Refuge

Representative Jim Jordan appears with Sara Carter and Greg Jarrett to discuss the refusal of Fusion-GPS media hub and professional propagandist Glenn Simpson to appear before congress.  [Discussing This Story]

Jim Jordan also points out the risk in President Trump’s current strategy. Timing the most damning evidence against the soft-coup usurpers to come out after the election; in combination with the DOJ/FBI influenced IG report on FISA abuse; can also mean that if Democrats win the house the corruption scandal simply melts back into the swamp…

 

Representative Jim Jordan Discusses UniParty Strategy to Run Out The Clock… — The Last Refuge

Guns Don’t Kill People: Democrats Do

Absolute Truth from the Word of God

Remember when we first started hearing that Islam was the Religion of Peace? The world (except for those whose heads are stuck in the sand) found out quickly that this description of Islam was laughable.

Not only is this blatantly false, but we can safely say that the Qur’an is a book of hate and killing. Islam is not even a true religion. It is a totalitarian political system, bent on world domination.

Just ask the Brits who live in London.  They know.

But the imams and the mosques show only the face to the world which they wish us to see. It’s all built on lies – in Arabic “taqiyya.”

Well now we are once again seeing the true colors of another group of people. The Democrats wish to be known as the “Party of Compassion.”  They still have most Jews and Blacks duped into believing…

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A False Church — Ligonier Ministries Blog

Martin Luther initially hoped that the Roman Catholic Church would reform from within, but when it would not, he concluded that it was a false church. In this brief clip, W. Robert Godfrey examines some of Luther’s harsh words for Rome.

For October only, when you give a donation of any amount, we’ll send you a copy of the award-winning documentary Luther: The Life and Legacy of the German Reformer. Don’t miss this special offer. Offer ends 10/31/18.

Transcript

One of the harder things for moderns to understand is that in the sixteenth century there was absolutely no notion of denominationalism. For centuries, almost from its beginning, the church had thought about the church as either the true church or false churches. You know, today—I’m a Presbyterian, you’re a Baptist, somebody else is Lutheran—we have differences, and we may even see some of our differences as important, but we regard one another as Christians. That was not the case through most of the history of the church. You were in either in the one true church or you were part of a false church.

[Martin] Luther initially hoped very much to be a positive reforming influence in what he saw as the one true church, but when it became more and more obvious that the Roman Catholic Church would not listen to him, would not reform itself, Luther’s conclusion was that Rome is establishing itself as a false church. That’s why fairly early on in the 1520s Luther begins to talk about the pope as the antichrist. Again, maybe when people in the twenty-first century read that, they think he’s being sort of rhetorical. He was not being rhetorical. He believed that the pope was the eschatological revelation of the antichrist at the end of the age. So Luther is very earnest in everything that he says both about the pope and about the Church of Rome. What’s interesting is that when you read most Protestant writers in the sixteenth century, they never refer to the “Catholic church.” They refer to the Roman church, and their argument is that we are the catholic church. We are the universal church. We stand in unity with the church of all ages.

Now Luther and all the Reformers believed there were true Christians in the Roman church that still held to the gospel, but they believed they could say that the Roman church was a false church because it’s official teachers had rejected the gospel.

A False Church — Ligonier Ministries Blog

October 13 Daily Help

GOD is glorified by our serving him in our proper vocations. Every lawful trade may be sanctified by the gospel to noblest ends. Turn to the Bible, and you will find the most menial forms of labor connected either with most daring deeds of faith, or with persons whose lives have been illustrious for holiness. Therefore be not discontented with your calling. Whatever God has made your position, or your work, abide in that, unless you are quite sure that he calls you to something else. Let your first care be to glorify God to the utmost of your power where you are. Fill your present sphere to his praise, and if he needs you in another he will show it you.[1]


[1] Spurgeon, C. H. (1892). Daily Help (p. 290). Baltimore: R. H. Woodward & Company.

October 13, 2018 Afternoon Verse Of The Day

3 God is different from the “many” who oppose him. David addressed God confidently with an emphatic and contrastive use of the personal pronoun “you” (weʾattâ). How different he is from the rebellious masses! David was certain of God’s promises that are confirmed in the covenant (cf. 2:6–9); therefore, his confidence rested in the nature of God, described here by a metaphor (“shield”) and by one of his attributes (“glory”). He was convinced that God’s kingship is forever. And although the kingship was forcibly removed from the Lord’s anointed, he was still protected by God’s kingship. With the metaphor, “shield” (māgēn; cf. 7:10; 18:2, 30; 28:7; Ge 15:1), the psalmist places himself under the protection of the Great King, who has promised to protect his own (Ge 15:1; Dt 33:29; see Reflections, p. 733, Yahweh Is the Divine Warrior).

The power of the Great King is referred to by the word “glory” (kebôdî, lit., “my Glorious One,” NIV text note). The phrase signifies the Lord’s glorious rule over his kingdom. He is the Lord of hosts, with tens of thousands of angels at his command. Even as a king can be described as glorious because of his vast armies, so the Lord is glorious because he can marshal the angelic host to aid his children (34:7; 91:11). The king puts his confidence in the protection that God alone can provide, because his glory is greater than any human power. The glory of God is nothing less than the revelation of his hiddenness!

The psalmist explains further that the “Glorious One” gives him reason to lift up his head. The “lifting up of the head” is a Hebraism expressive of confidence in the Lord, who has power to raise up the humble and abase the mighty (1 Sa 2:7–8; Ps 103:7–9). He exalts whom he wills and when he wills. The psalms express confidence that the Lord will “lift up the head” of his people when he is victorious over his enemies (cf. 18:46–50; 27:4–6; 110:5–7).

Even though the king had reason for despondency, his knowledge of God gave him reason for hope. The confidence of the king was not in his knowledge of the future or in the might of his forces, but in God, who had installed him as king (2:6).[1]


3 Affirmation: divine protection. But you, is emphatic. The breakthrough from the gloom of vs 1, 2 is to grasp afresh what God is. My Glorious One, (lit.) ‘my glory’: David has been stripped of all earthly pomp but cannot be deprived of God. My head (cf. 2 Sa. 15:30).[2]


3:3. In the face of such antagonism, David found comfort in God’s character. Using the metaphor of a shield, he said that God was the true Source of his protection (in spite of their taunts). The psalmists often spoke of God as a shield to depict His protection (7:10; 18:2, 30; 28:7; 33:20; 59:11; 84:11; 115:9–11; 119:114; 144:2). David was confident that God would restore him to his throne. The words lifts up my head express restoration to dignity and position (see the same idiom in Gen. 40:13, 20; 2 Kings 25:27, kjv).[3]


3:3 The mood of the Psalm changes in verse 3. David gets his eyes off his enemies and on the Lord, and that changes his whole outlook. Immediately he realizes that he has in Jehovah a shield, a source of glory, and the One who lifts up his head. As his shield, the Lord gives him complete protection from enemy assaults. As his glory, the Lord gives him honor, dignity and vindication in place of the shame, reproach and slander that were being heaped upon him. As the lifter of his head, the Lord encourages and exalts him.[4]


3:3 are a shield around me His enemies’ taunts have not caused him to doubt God. The psalmist trusts Yahweh to protect him like a shield—a common metaphor for God’s protection (7:10; 18:2, 30; 28:7).

the one who lifts up my head A lifted head signaled confidence and pride (27:6), while a lowered head signaled defeat and disgrace (Judg 8:28).[5]


3:3 The line uses several metaphors—“shield” for God’s protection (Gn 15:1), “glory” for the evidence of His blessing of kingship (Ps 34:7; 91:11), and “lifts up my head” for the restoration to the throne (Gn 40:13; 1 Sm 2:7–8; Ps 110:7).[6]


3:3 The image of God as a shield is common, especially in the Psalms (18:30; 115:9; 144:2). It represents protection during a time of attack. A more unusual description is identifying God as one’s glory. The Hebrew word kavod (lit “heavy”) is often used of a person’s reputation or significance, sometimes being translated as “honor.” Its use here seems to indicate that the psalmist found his own significance and honor linked to his relationship with the Lord rather than in his own strength.[7]


[1] VanGemeren, W. A. (2008). Psalms. In T. Longman III & D. E. Garland (Eds.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Psalms (Revised Edition) (Vol. 5, p. 102). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

[2] Motyer, J. A. (1994). The Psalms. In D. A. Carson, R. T. France, J. A. Motyer, & G. J. Wenham (Eds.), New Bible commentary: 21st century edition (4th ed., p. 490). Leicester, England; Downers Grove, IL: Inter-Varsity Press.

[3] Ross, A. P. (1985). Psalms. In J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck (Eds.), The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures (Vol. 1, p. 793). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

[4] MacDonald, W. (1995). Believer’s Bible Commentary: Old and New Testaments. (A. Farstad, Ed.) (p. 551). Nashville: Thomas Nelson.

[5] Barry, J. D., Mangum, D., Brown, D. R., Heiser, M. S., Custis, M., Ritzema, E., … Bomar, D. (2012, 2016). Faithlife Study Bible (Ps 3:3). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.

[6] Cabal, T., Brand, C. O., Clendenen, E. R., Copan, P., Moreland, J. P., & Powell, D. (2007). The Apologetics Study Bible: Real Questions, Straight Answers, Stronger Faith (p. 791). Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.

[7] Warstler, K. R. (2017). Psalms. In E. A. Blum & T. Wax (Eds.), CSB Study Bible: Notes (p. 819). Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers.

Saturday Sampler: October 7 — October 13

The Outspoken TULIP

Symetry Sampler 02Looking at how believers should handle personal sin, Mike Ratliff of Possessing the Treasure rhetorically asks, Do genuine Christians need to confess their sins and seek forgiveness and cleansing? You undoubtedly know the short answer, but Ratliff provides Scriptural substantiation for that answer.

As happens every October, Reformed writers turn their attention to the 16th Century. You’ll see plenty of articles about Luther and Calvin, which makes Steven J. Lawson’s Zurich Revolutionary: Ulrich Zwingliso refreshing. You can find this article on the Ligonier blog.

Leslie A, in Growing 4 Life, passionately declares I’m Not the One Who Moved. She addresses quite a few problems in present-day evangelicalism, rightly tracing them back to an abandonment of three of the five Solas.

As the owner of Berean Research, Amy Spreeman is Holding Onto Scripture as she reevaluates the role and implementation of discernment ministry. Join me in…

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