April 12 What the Cross Represents

Scripture Reading: Luke 2:25–35

Key Verses: Luke 2:34–35

Then Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary His mother, “Behold, this Child is destined for the fall and rising of many in Israel, and for a sign which will be spoken against (yes, a sword will pierce through your own soul also), that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.”

We loosely toss around the phrase “the cross” like everyone understands the validity and weight of the object to which we are referring. But many people do not understand at all what the cross represents—even some Christians.

The cross is the place where Jesus died a sinner’s death for us, the place where all shame, guilt, and sin are laid bare, the place where life begins. Despite the wrong choices we have made in life, the heaviness of our sins, or the inconsistency of our faith, we can all find common ground at the foot of the cross—the place where we can cast aside the troubles of our mind and receive the benefits of salvation. It is there that God redeems our lives into something truly valuable and beautiful, just as He has always planned for us.

Upon seeing Jesus as a baby, Simeon exclaimed, “Behold, this Child is destined for the fall and rising of many in Israel, and for a sign which will be spoken against (yes, a sword will pierce through your own soul also), that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed” (Luke 2:34–35).

The cross, though thick and dull, is the place where hearts are seared before God and true freedom begins. Despite what we may perceive about God, He desires the best for our lives and wants us to receive the freedom He has so readily made available to those who are willing to accept it.

Lord, my life, my eternal life, began at Your cross. Thank You for setting me free by yielding to death by crucifixion.[1]


[1] Stanley, C. F. (2006). Pathways to his presence (p. 107). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

3 thoughts on “April 12 What the Cross Represents

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.