06/16/19 Practical Discipleship: Asking Questions — ChuckLawless.com

READING: Matthew 16:13-20

Jesus was a master at using questions. He raised questions to evaluate and teach the disciples (e.g., Matt 8:26, 16:13-15). He used them to quiet His opponents (e.g., Matt 21:23-27, Luke 5:22-24, John 5:47), and He used them to express His righteous frustration (e.g., Mark 9:19). His questions were penetrating, to the point, sometimes affirming and sometimes reproving. Never were they simply “fillers” in a conversation.

As we invest in others, it’s good to learn to ask questions—even a lot of them, to . . .

  • learn the story of our disciples—asking questions that show our interest and give our disciples purpose and affirmation
  • hold our disciples accountable to spiritual disciplines and godly living—to help them evaluate their own lives
  • find out the truth when we wonder about our disciples’ lives—since confrontation is much easier if we start with a question mark rather than an exclamation point
  • determine the best direction to go in a discipling relationship—recognizing that we can’t plan well unless we have some sense of our disciples’ interest and needs.

So, let questions drive much of your conversation with those you’re discipling. You’ll learn much, and you’ll be a better disciplemaker. You’ll be more like Jesus, in fact.

PRAYER: “Father, teach me to use questions wisely.”

TOMORROW’S READING:  1 Chronicles 9:1-11:9, John 17:20-18:14

via 06/16/19 Practical Discipleship: Asking Questions — ChuckLawless.com

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