Daily Archives: July 21, 2019

July 21 The Struggle with Temptation

Scripture Reading: Luke 4:1–13

Key Verses: Luke 4:1–2

Then Jesus, being filled with the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, being tempted for forty days by the devil. And in those days He ate nothing, and afterward, when they had ended, He was hungry.

Everyone faces temptation. Even the Son of God was tempted by Satan to turn away from God. But Jesus saw through the enemy’s schemes and remained firm in His love and devotion to the Father (Luke 4:1–13).

One of the reasons Jesus came was to personally identify with our needs and struggles. He understands how you feel under the weight of temptation. He has faced the tempter and overcome the darkness and adversity associated with Satan’s fiery trials.

When you face temptation, know that you do not face it alone. Jesus is with you, and He provides the strength you need to say no to every dark thought or evil imagination. In times of temptation, when the enemy whispers lies to defeat and discourage, take your stand against him by clothing yourself in the mighty armor of God (Ephesians 6). Also know that you can never disappoint God. He knows exactly what you are doing even before you do it, and He loves you still.

Temptation is not a sin. Sin is the result of our acting on the temptation. God provides the strength we need to steer clear of temptation. You can say no to all evil because Jesus lives in you, and He has given you the Holy Spirit to lead you into all truth and knowledge. Therefore, take your stand as a child of God and claim His strength and victory!

Father, I know temptation is common to all. Give me the strength to steer clear of temptation and reject evil.[1]


[1] Stanley, C. F. (2006). Pathways to his presence (p. 212). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

July 21 Greed

Scripture Reading: Proverbs 11:24–26

Key Verse: James 1:17

Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning.

What drove the two biggest business deals of the late eighties—the $25 billion takeover fight for RJR Nabisco and the $14 billion merger of Time Inc. and Warner Communications? Was it the conviction that bigger is better? Was it the search for corporate “synergies”? On paper, maybe. But three telling new accounts make it clear that the real moving forces were raw ego, greed, and ambition.

Such is the way Time magazine described the driving force of greed in our culture.

From corporate takeovers to individual ambitions, greed is a prime motivation for millions. We want more than we have; we want it now.

Clearly the Christian must move countercurrent to the prevailing tide of greed when it comes to a generous spirit. Generosity does not flow from educational, governmental, or financial systems. The polluted power of sin within each of us prevents generosity from naturally coming forth from us.

Generosity is a godly quality because God is the Author of cheerful giving (2 Cor. 9:7). Do you feel stingy? Are you slow to help others? Only a deliberate step of submission to the Lord Jesus Christ with a humble request for a giving heart can begin the blessings of a generous spirit.

Dear heavenly Father, deliver me from greed. Make me a cheerful giver. Bless me with a generous spirit.[1]


[1] Stanley, C. F. (1999). On holy ground (p. 212). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

July 21 Perfect Faith

Scripture reading: Matthew 14:22–27

Key verse: Matthew 14:27

Immediately Jesus spoke to them, saying, “Be of good cheer! It is I; do not be afraid.”

Just as Peter did, we spend a good portion of our lives learning to live by faith. Peter was certain that he had unwavering faith in Christ. However, it was about to be tested. In the middle of a severe storm on the open Sea of Galilee, the disciples tried not to become overwhelmed with fear. They struggled furiously with the sails and longed for Jesus’ help. But He was not with them on the trip, or at least that was what they perceived.

Suddenly, something caught their attention. An image that appeared to be a ghost was walking toward them on the water’s raging surface. It was Jesus, but their frantic minds did not recognize Him.

They cried out in despair. Jesus, sensing their anguish called back, “Be of good cheer! It is I; do not be afraid” (Matt. 14:27). Peter exhibited real faith as he stepped out of the boat and walked toward Jesus.

It wasn’t until he was a distance away from the boat that his faith began to crumble. The stormy swells and the winds created a curtain of doubt in Peter’s mind. His attention shifted from the Lord to the storm, and he began to sink. Perfect faith is set on Christ. It does not waver. And the person who exhibits it will never sink, not because of his ability or strength, but because of God’s faithfulness.

Perfect my faith, Lord. Give me a faith that does not waver. Give me a faith that is securely grounded in Your faithfulness.[1]


[1] Stanley, C. F. (2000). Into His presence (p. 212). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

Sunday Talks: Dr. Ben Carson Discusses Ridiculous Racist Accusations and Media Complicity… — The Last Refuge

HUD Secretary Dr. Ben Carson appears on Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo to discuss the ridiculous accusations of racism against President Trump.

In one of the reference points, Dr Carson reminds everyone about the February 2016 ABC debate when all the other candidates left him hanging, but not Donald Trump.  Funnily enough CTH wrote about that specific moment at the time; and it’s interesting how that moment stayed with Dr. Carson and he references it well over three years later.

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FLASHBACK February 6th, 2016 – Few people will talk about this, and fewer will even want to acknowledge it, but what Donald Trump did before the ABC debate began shows the measure of a real man’s worth.

Trump and Carson

At the beginning of the ABC debate, each of the candidates were being introduced in a specific order. The first name called to the stage was Chris Christie. The applause was loud and lingered through the time when Martha Raddatz called the second candidate Ben Carson.

Dr. Carson did not hear his name called (easy to understand why when you listen to the video) and stood in the entry-way. The moderators, with their backs to the candidates, didn’t notice his absence and called the third name on the list, Ted Cruz.

Ted walked past Dr. Carson and onto the stage. Carson remained in the awkward, and embarrassing position, ‘no-mans-land’, on-camera but out of sight of the live audience.

What happened next shows the remarkable character of Donald Trump.

The fourth name called was Donald Trump, but by then the back-stage crew and candidates were aware of Dr. Carsons’ position. Trump slowly approached, and then realized the embarrassing position of a fellow candidate hanging in the wind.

Trump showed his leadership by standing right next to his friend, and not walking onto the stage.

The other names continued to be called, and proceeded as mentioned. But not Donald Trump, he remained with his colleague thereby reducing the internal anxiety felt by Carson.

It would have been very easy for Trump to walk by Ben, just like all the other candidates did. But instead he chose to wait, and remove the embarrassment factor by infinite magnitudes.

Then, like a boss, when Dr. Carson was called to the stage, Donald Trump waited and allowed Dr. Carson to get the audience response and appreciation.

It takes a lot of courage to make split second decisions like that, and it shows a remarkable insight into the man’s character.

Watch.

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People often mistake Donald Trump’s self-confidence for arrogance or even narcissism. But there is not a narcissist on the planet who would have put themselves into a position like that to assist a competing colleague.

Here’s Mr. Trump talking to an audience member several years ago, and reminding them that no-one is “less than”.

via Sunday Talks: Dr. Ben Carson Discusses Ridiculous Racist Accusations and Media Complicity… — The Last Refuge