August 21, 2019 Morning Verse Of The Day

† 25:9 — “Behold, this is our God; we have waited for Him, and He will save us.”

Throughout the Bible, God promises to act on behalf of those who wait for Him. In the act of waiting, we demonstrate that we believe the promises of God and that we trust Him to fulfill them all.[1]


9. And it shall be said. The verb אמר (āmăr) is indefinite, “He shall say;” but as the discourse does not relate to one or another individual, but to all in general, I chose to render it in a passive form. This is an excellent conclusion; for it shews that God’s benefits are not in any respect doubtful or uncertain, but are actually received and enjoyed by men. The Prophet declares that the banquet, of which he formerly spoke, (verse 6,) will not in vain be prepared by God; for men shall feast on it, and possess everlasting joy.

Lo, this is our God. That joyful shout, which he declares will be public, is the actual test and proof, so to speak, of the experience of the grace of God. This passage ought to be carefully observed; for the Prophet shews that there will be such a revelation as shall fix the minds of men on the word of God, so that they will rely on it without any kind of hesitation; and if these things belong, as they undoubtedly do belong, to the kingdom of Christ, we derive from them this valuable fruit, that Christians, unless they are wanting to themselves, and reject the grace of God, have undoubted truth on which they may safely rely. God has removed all ground of doubt, and has revealed himself to them in such a manner, that they may venture freely to declare that they know with certainty what is his will, and may say with truth what Christ said to the Samaritan woman, “We worship what we know.” (John 4:22.) Having been informed by the gospel as to the grace offered through Christ, we do not now wander in uncertain opinions, as others do, but embrace God and his pure worship. Let us boldly say, “Away with all the inventions of men!”

It is proper to observe the contrast between that dark and feeble kind of knowledge which the fathers enjoyed under the law, and the fulness which shines forth to us in the gospel. Though God deigned to bestow on his ancient people the light of heavenly doctrine, yet he made himself more familiarly known through Christ, as we are told; “No man hath seen God at any time; the only-begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, hath declared him.” (John 1:18.) The Prophet now extols that certainty which the Son of God brought to us by his coming, when he “sheweth to us the Father.” (John 14:9.) Yet, while we excel the ancient people in this respect, that the reconciliation obtained through Christ makes God, as it were, more gracious to us, there is no other way in which God can be known but through Christ, who is “the pattern and image of his substance.” (Heb. 1:3.) “He who knoweth not the Son, knoweth not the Father.” (John 14:7.) Though Jews, Mahometans, and other infidels, boast that they worship God, the creator of heaven and earth, yet they worship an imaginary God. However obstinate they may be, they follow doubtful and uncertain opinions instead of the truth; they grope in the dark, and worship their own imagination instead of God. In short, apart from Christ, all religion is deceitful and transitory, and every kind of worship ought to be abhorred and boldly condemned.

Nor is it without good reason that the Prophet employs not only the adverb Lo, but the demonstrative pronoun This, in order to attest more fully the presence of God, as, a little afterwards, by repeating the declaration of certainty and confidence, he expresses the steadfastness that will be found in those who shall worship God through Christ. It is certain that we cannot comprehend God in his majesty, for he “dwelleth in unapproachable light,” (1 Tim. 6:16,) which will immediately overpower us, if we attempt to rise to it; and therefore he accommodates himself to our weakness, gives himself to us through Christ, by whom he makes us partakers of wisdom, righteousness, truth, and other blessings. (1 Cor. 1:30.)

This is Jehovah. It is worthy of observation that, when he calls Christ the God of believers, he gives to him the name “Jehovah;” from which we infer that the actual eternity of God belongs to the person of Christ. Besides, since Christ has thus made himself known to us by the gospel, this proves the base ingratitude of those who, not satisfied with so full a manifestation, have dared to add to it their own idle speculation, as has been done by Popery.

We have waited for him. He expresses the firmness and perseverance of those who have once embraced God in Christ; for it ought not to be a temporary knowledge, but we must persevere in it steadfastly to the end. Now, Isaiah speaks in the name of the ancient Church, which at that time had its seat, strictly speaking, among the Jews alone; and therefore, despising as it were all the gods that were worshipped in other countries, he boldly declares that he alone, who revealed himself to Abraham, (Gen. 15:1,) and proclaimed his law by the hand of Moses, (Exodus 20:1, 2,) is the true God. Other nations, which were involved in the darkness of ignorance, did not “wait for” the Lord; for this “waiting” springs from faith, which is accompanied by patience, and there is no faith without the word.

Thus he warns believers that their salvation rests on hope and expectation; for the promises of God were as it were suspended till the coming of Christ. Besides, we ought to observe what was the condition of those times; for it appeared as if either the promise of God had come to nought, or he had rejected the posterity of Abraham. Certainly, though they looked very far, God did not at that time appear to them; and therefore they must have been endued with astonishing patience to endure such heavy and sharp temptations. Accordingly, he bids them wait quietly for the coming of Christ; for then they will clearly perceive how near God is to them that worship him.

The same doctrine ought to soothe us in the present day, so that, though our salvation be concealed, still we may “wait for the Lord” with firm and unshaken hope, and, when he is at a distance, may always say, Lo, here he is. In times of the greatest confusion, let us learn to distinguish him by this mark, This is he. As to the words, though he says, in the past tense,2 “We rejoiced and were glad in his salvation;” yet the words denote a continued act; and, a little before, he had said in the future tense, “He will save us.” The meaning may be thus summed up, “Christ will never disappoint the hopes of his people, if they call on him with patience.”[2]


9 Once more we hear a song of praise (cf. 24:14–16; 25:1–5), wonderfully expressing that joy in God that comes when patient trust finds its reward in consummated salvation. Its ideas and language are thoroughly characteristic of Isaiah, and various parts of the verse are paralleled in many different parts of the book (e.g., 8:17; 12:1–6; 30:18; 33:22; 35:1–4, 10; 40:9; 49:25–26; 52:7–10; 60:16; 65:18).[3]


9 Delitzsch is probably correct when he sees the reference to removing the reproach from God’s people (v. 8) as the immediate stimulus for this song. Although it had seemed impossibly long at the time, eventually the “waiting” will have been shown to be worth it all, and the song will burst forth (Rev. 6:9–11; 7:9–12). This connection with v. 8 may also explain the use of Moab to symbolize the nations, just as Malachi was to use Edom later (Mal. 1:2–5). It was particularly these neighboring nations which had taunted Judah for her apparently ineffectual trust in Yahweh. They had reproached Judah, but in the last day, the reproach would be all theirs (Ezek. 36:6–7).

Again, as in v. 1, the personal element is strong. God has shown himself faithful to his people and the response is seen in a deep sense of affinity. Ultimately, this is what the whole Exodus had been about: “You will be my people, and I will be your God” (Exod. 29:45, 46, etc.). But somehow that vision had gotten lost in the intervening years, so that Ezekiel and Isaiah had to look for it to be reinstated by the deliverance from the Exile (Ezek. 36:28). And perhaps Isaiah is saying here that it will not be completely realized until the final deliverance.

we waited for him expresses a fundamental element of the OT, and the Isaianic, concept of trust. It is the kind of confident expectation that is willing to put the times in God’s hands and to believe in spite of a long interval. This kind of trust has forsaken that manipulation which seeks instant gratification, and it has demonstrated the reality of its commitment to God by refusing to make him vindicate himself according to a human timetable. When such confident expectation is satisfied, the result is, as here, jubilation, for the one who waits has proven the sovereignty of God. That jubilation springs from the certainty that God can save. What a relief and a delight that is, for without a sovereign deliverer, we are merely pawns of a cruel chance.[4]


9. And it shall be said in that day, &c.—“After death has been swallowed up for ever, the people of God, who had been delivered from the hand of death, shall say to the Lord, Lo, this is our God, whom unbelievers regarded as only a man” [Jerome]. “The words are so moulded as to point us specially to the person of the Son of God, who ‘saves’ us; as He vouchsafed to Israel temporal saving, so to His elect He appears for the purpose of conferring eternal salvation” [Vitringa]. The Jews, however, have a special share in the words, This is our God (see on Is 25:6).

we have waited—“Waited” is characteristic of God’s people in all ages (Ge 49:18; Tit 2:13).

we will be glad and rejoice in his salvation—compare Ps 118:24, which refers to the second coming of Jesus (compare Ps 118:26, with Lu 13:35).[5]


Ver. 9.—It shall be said; literally, one shall say; i.e. the redeemed generally shall thus express themselves. We have waited for him. During all the weary time of their oppression and persecution, the godly remnant (ch. 24:13–15) was “waiting for the Lord,” i.e. trusting in him, expecting him to arise and scatter his enemies, wondering that he endured so long the “contradiction of sinners against himself” (Heb. 12:3), but content to abide his determination of the fitting season for coming forward as their Avenger, and now quite satisfied that he has avenged them in his own good time and in his own good way. We will be glad and rejoice (comp. Ps. 118:24 and Cant. 1:4).[6]


25:9. In that day (cf. 24:21), the day when the believing remnant will be delivered, they (the saved ones) will affirm their trust in the Lord, who saved them. In response they will say let us rejoice and be glad in the salvation He provided. Meanwhile, in Isaiah’s day, believers in Judah were to rejoice in the Lord’s salvation.[7]


25:9 Note the change from “my God” (v. 1) to our God. This verse is the faithful’s song of praise. Be glad and rejoice may be rephrased as “be exceedingly happy.” Salvation is deliverance from constraint, whether it is falling into a pit (Ps. 40:2) or the constraint of sin and death.[8]


25:9 Lord for whom we have waited. To wait for God entails an ultimate trust in Him, not becoming impatient when His timetable for final salvation differs from ours (cf. 26:8; 33:2; 40:31).[9]


25:9 Behold. See 24:1. At last, the realization of the forward-looking faith that patiently waited for a renewed society and a renewed earth (cf. the expectation in 40:9–11). this is our God. An expression of wholehearted identification with him (cf. Ex. 29:45–46). we have waited. Salvation is worth the wait, and is even worth the reproach of Isa. 25:8. Salvation is his entirely, God’s alone, from first to last (cf. Ex. 14:13; 15:2; Ps. 68:19–20; 98:2–3).[10]


[1] Stanley, C. F. (2005). The Charles F. Stanley life principles Bible: New King James Version (Is 25:9). Nashville, TN: Nelson Bibles.

[2] Calvin, J., & Pringle, W. (2010). Commentary on the Book of the Prophet Isaiah (Vol. 2, pp. 200–203). Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software.

[3] Grogan, G. W. (2008). Isaiah. In T. Longman III, Garland David E. (Eds.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Proverbs–Isaiah (Revised Edition) (Vol. 6, p. 628). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan.

[4] Oswalt, J. N. (1986). The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 1–39 (pp. 465–466). Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

[5] Jamieson, R., Fausset, A. R., & Brown, D. (1997). Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible (Vol. 1, p. 458). Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

[6] Spence-Jones, H. D. M. (Ed.). (1910). Isaiah (Vol. 1, p. 401). London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company.

[7] Martin, J. A. (1985). Isaiah. In J. F. Walvoord & R. B. Zuck (Eds.), The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures (Vol. 1, p. 1074). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

[8] Radmacher, E. D., Allen, R. B., & House, H. W. (1999). Nelson’s new illustrated Bible commentary (p. 833). Nashville: T. Nelson Publishers.

[9] MacArthur, J. F., Jr. (2006). The MacArthur study Bible: New American Standard Bible. (Is 25:9). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

[10] Crossway Bibles. (2008). The ESV Study Bible (p. 1284). Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles.

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