Daily Archives: May 16, 2020

May 16 Life-Changing Moments With God

A bondservant of Jesus Christ.

I call You Teacher and Lord, and so You are. If I serve You, Lord Jesus, I will follow You; and where You are, there I, Your servant, will be also. If I serve You, Your Father will honor me. I take Your yoke and learn from You, for You are gentle and lowly in heart, and I find rest for my soul. Your yoke is easy and Your burden is light.

Things that were gain to me, these I count loss for You, Christ Jesus. Having been set free from sin, and become a slave of God, I have fruit to holiness, and the end, everlasting life.

You no longer call me servant, for a servant does not know what his master is doing; but You call me friend, for all that You heard from Your Father You have made known to me. I am no longer a slave but a son.

Therefore I stand fast in the liberty by which You, Jesus Christ, have made me free, and I will not be entangled again with a yoke of bondage. I have been called to liberty; I will not use liberty as an opportunity for the flesh.

As You lead, let me follow.

Romans 1:1; John 13:13; John 12:26; Matthew 11:29–30; Philippians 3:7; Romans 6:22; John 15:15; Galatians 4:7; Galatians 5:1, 13[1]

 

[1] Jeremiah, D. (2007). Life-Changing Moments With God (p. 151). Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson Publishers.

May—16 The Poor Man’s Evening Portion

So will I go in unto the king, which is not according to the law; and if I perish, I perish.—Esth. 4:16.

What a noble act of the soul is faith! Who, indeed, but the Lord Jesus, can be the author or giver of it? Ponder it well, my soul, and see if thou canst discover the smallest possible degree of it in thee. To have the least portion of it, is an evidence of an interest in Christ: for it is said, that “as many as were ordained to eternal life believed!” (Acts 13:48.) And oh! what an honour is it to give credit to God the Father’s testimony of his dear Son! Sit down, my soul, this evening, and pause over the subject. There are more difficulties to the exercise of it than are generally considered. The case of Esther, in the court of the Persian king, will serve, in some measure, to explain it. By the law of Persia, every individual, whether man or woman, who ventured into the inner court of the king’s presence, uncalled, was condemned to death; neither was there any remission of the punishment, unless the king held out to the offender the golden sceptre. The case, however, for which Esther was constrained to go in, was of that nature, that there remained no alternative but to go or die. Contrary to the known law of the realm, she therefore ventured, crying out as she went, “If I perish, I perish.” Now this is quite the state of the poor sinner. The law of God for ever separates between a holy God and an unholy sinner. “Thou canst not see my face and live.” Nothing that is “unholy, can stand in God’s sight.” These are the solemn declarations of the law of heaven. God hath, indeed, reserved the grace of pardon, to whom he will hold out the golden sceptre. But even this grace doth not reign but through righteousness. The law admits of nothing in a way of pardon, but upon the ground of satisfaction. A righteousness every sinner must have in himself, or in a Redeemer, or he will perish everlastingly. Hast thou, then, my soul, that faith, that trust, that sure dependence, upon the Lord Jesus Christ, as to go in unto the King, which is not according to law, but wholly on the blessed authority of the gospel, determined, like Esther, to be saved by this grace of thy King and Saviour, or not at all? Yes, Lord! I come. Precious Emmanuel! wilt thou not hold forth the golden sceptre of thy grace, and say to my soul, as thou didst to the poor woman of the gospel: “Great is thy faith, be it unto thee even as thou wilt?”[1]

 

[1] Hawker, R. (1845). The Poor Man’s Evening Portion (A New Edition, pp. 151–152). Philadelphia: Thomas Wardle.

May 16 Streams in the Desert

Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard, and I am come for thy words. But the prince of the kingdom of Persia withstood me one and twenty days.” (Dan. 10:12, 13)

WE have wonderful teaching here on prayer, and we are shown the direct hindrance from Satan.

Daniel had fasted and prayed twenty-one days, and had a very hard time in prayer. As far as we read the narrative, it was not because Daniel was not a good man, nor because his prayer was not right; but it was because of a special attack of Satan.

The Lord started a messenger to tell Daniel that his prayer was answered the moment Daniel began to pray; but an evil angel met the good angel and wrestled with him, hindering him. There was a conflict in the heavens; and Daniel seemed to go through an agony on earth the same as that which was going on in the heavens.

We wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers … against wicked spirits in high places (Eph. 6:12, margin).

Satan delayed the answer three full weeks. Daniel nearly succumbed, and Satan would have been glad to kill him; but God will not suffer anything to come above that we “are able to bear.”

Many a Christian’s prayer is hindered by Satan; but you need not fear when your prayers and faith pile up; for after a while they will be like a flood, and will not only sweep the answer through, but will also bring some new accompanying blessing.—Sermon.

Hell does its worst with the saints. The rarest souls have been tested with high pressures and temperatures, but Heaven will not desert them.—W. L. Watkinson.[1]

 

[1] Cowman, L. B. (1925). Streams in the Desert (pp. 148–149). Los Angeles, CA: The Oriental Missionary Society.

May 16 The Interpreter: Spurgeon’s Devotional Bible

May 16.—Morning. [Or September 28.]
“A flattering mouth worketh ruin.”

THE chastisements of God fell very heavily upon David from the time of his great sin, even to the end of his life. His children became the source of his trials. Amnon fell into the foulest sin, and Absalom his brother slew him on account of it. Absalom having obtained forgiveness for the murder, returned to the court and commenced at once to plot against his own father, who loved him far too well. In his attempts to undermine his father’s authority he acted very cunningly, using every art to win popular applause.

2 Samuel 15:1–12

And it came to pass after this, that Absalom prepared him chariots and horses, and fifty men to run before him. (Outward pomp often catches the attention of the populace, and therefore Absalom added to the attraction of his own handsome person the unusual magnificence of chariots and running footmen.)

2, 3 And Absalom rose up early, and stood beside the way of the gate: and it was so, that when any man that had a controversy came to the king for judgment, then Absalom called unto him, and said, Of what city art thou? And he said, Thy servant is of one of the tribes of Israel. And Absalom said unto him, See, thy matters are good and right; but there is no man deputed of the king to hear thee.

Absalom said moreover, Oh that I were made judge in the land, that every man which hath any suit or cause might come unto me, and I would do him justice!

And it was so, that when any man came nigh to him to do him obeisance, he put forth his hand, and took him, and kissed him.

Absalom’s ambition led him to take great pains to appear affable and attentive to all. He was early at the palace gate and spoke with all suitors, being “hail-fellow well met” with them all. He flattered each one that his cause was good, and pretended to regret that justice was much neglected; and applicants were kept waiting. If he were king, matters would be seen to at once, and no one should have to complain of delay or injustice. Everybody said “What a courteous prince! What a just and careful ruler Absalom would be!”

And on this manner did Absalom to all Israel that came to the king for judgment: so Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.

The hearts of the people were not won, but stolen, for the vain young prince deceived them. While pretending such zeal for their welfare, he was only advancing his own traitorous schemes.

7, 8 And it came to pass after forty years, that Absalom said unto the king, I pray thee, let me go and pay my vow, which I have vowed unto the Lord, in Hebron. For thy servant vowed a vow while I abode at Geshur in Syria, saying, If the Lord shall bring me again indeed to Jerusalem, then I will serve the Lord.

To crown all his other deceit, Absalom pretended to be exceedingly devout, and declared that he must make a pilgrimage to Hebron, in order to keep a holy vow which he had made in the days of his exile. He is a bad man indeed who uses religion as a stalking horse for his base ambition.

And the king said unto him, Go in peace. So he arose, and went to Hebron.

10, 11 But Absalom sent spies throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, As soon as ye hear the sound of the trumpet, then ye shall say, Absalom reigneth in Hebron. And with Absalom went two hundred men out of Jerusalem, that were called; and they went in their simplicity, and they knew not any thing.

These persons accompanied Absalom to join with him in his devotions, and out of respect for the king’s son; but they were not in the secret of the plot. Absalom, however, used their presence for his own ends, by making the common people believe that these honourable men had left David and gone over to his rebel son.

12 And Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David’s counsellor, from his city, even from Giloh, while he offered sacrifices. And the conspiracy was strong; for the people increased continually with Absalom.

Ahithophel was the intimate friend as well as the counsellor of David; but he appears to have selfishly gone over to the faction of the young prince, because he judged it to be stronger than the party of the king. Thus David was brought into sore distress, his friends were forsaking him, his enemy was growing stronger and aiming to dethrone him; and worst of all, that enemy was his favourite son. What mists and black days befell David after he so sadly swerved from the way of holiness.

May 16.—Evening. [Or September 29.]
“The King also himself passed over the brook Kidron.”

2 Samuel 15:13–26

AND there came a messenger to David, saying, The hearts of the men of Israel are after Absalom. (This must have sounded like a thunder-clap in the ear of David. While rejoicing in the belief that his son was religiously employed in paying his vows, the news of his rebellion was suddenly brought to him. David had rebelled against his God and king, and now he sees his own son in arms against him. How well had God kept his threatening that evil should arise to him out of his own house!)

14 And David said unto all his servants that were with him at Jerusalem, Arise, and let us flee; for we shall not else escape from Absalom: make speed to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly, and bring evil upon us, and smite the city with the edge of the sword. (The city could not be defended, for its walls were not built; therefore, David had prayed, “Build thou the walls of Jerusalem.”)

15 And the king’s servants said unto the king, Behold, thy servants are ready to do whatsoever my lord the king shall appoint.

16, 17 And the king went forth, and all his household after him, and tarried in a place that was far off. (He must needs go on foot, though his wicked son had horses: he took his family with him, for he was always a loving father, and would not leave them in danger. Who can tell the sorrow which filled poor David’s heart? God’s rod smote him heavily.)

18 And all his servants passed on beside him; and all the Cherethites (or executioners), and all the Pelethites (or messengers), and all the Gittites, six hundred men which came after him from Gath, passed on before the king.

These were his body-guard, and remained faithful when others deserted to the popular side. May we always adhere to our Lord Jesus, even though all the world should wander after the beast and the false prophet.

19, 20 Then said the king to Ittai the Gittite, Wherefore goest thou also with us? return to thy place, and abide with the king: for thou art a stranger, and also an exile. Whereas thou earnest but yesterday, should I this day make thee go up and down with us? seeing I go whither I may, return thou, and take back thy brethren: mercy and truth be with thee.

David was too generous to wish to bring troubles upon others; much as he needed Ittai’s help, he would not impose upon his kindness.

21 And Ittai answered the king, and said, As the Lord liveth, and as my lord the king liveth, surely in what place my lord the king shall be, whether in death or life, even there also will thy servant be. (After this true-hearted fashion we ought to follow Jesus.)

22 And David said to Ittai, Go and pass over. And Ittai the Gittite passed over, and all his men, and all the little ones that were with him. (The Lord did not leave his servant quite alone, but found him friends in his need.)

23 And all the country wept with a loud voice, and all the people passed over: the king also himself passed over the brook Kidron, and all the people passed over, toward the way of the wilderness. (The common people mourned with their king, and well they might. There was a yet sadder sight when Jesus, “the King, also himself passed over the brook Kidron.” O Lord, we see thee typified by David, and our hearts adore thee.)

24, 25, 26 And lo Zadok also, and all the Levites were with him, bearing the ark of the covenant of God: And the king said unto Zadok, Carry back the ark of God into the city: if I shall find favour in the eyes of the Lord, he will bring me again, and shew me both it, and his habitation: But if he thus say, I have no delight in thee; behold, here am I, let him do to me as seemeth good unto him. (He was jealous for the safety of the ark and the priests, and therefore would not have them exposed to the same dangers as himself. He was also deeply submissive to the Lord’s will, and thereby showed how much his trials had been sanctified to him. It is a blessed thing when the visitations, which God sends upon us for sin, bow us in lowly reverence and humble acquiescence at the Master’s feet. So may the Lord always bless our family afflictions to each one of us.)

Jesus, whom angel hosts adore,

Became a man of griefs for me;

In love, though rich, becoming poor,

That I, through him, enrich’d might be.[1]

 

[1] Spurgeon, C. H. (1964). The Interpreter: Spurgeon’s Devotional Bible (pp. 286–287). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.

Government Could Enforce Who You’re Allowed To Socialize With Via Tracking App | ZeroHedge News

Authored by Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

In the “new normal” of social distancing, governments could dictate who you’re allowed to socialize with and punish wrongdoers via a smart phone tracking app.

Governments are now considering a post-lockdown world of “social bubbles,” which in the UK translates into a proposal to allow people to visit “10 friends and family.”

The Belgian government is also considering permitting people to have a designated list of people they can visit in order to keep the risk of transmitting COVID-19 low.

Psychologist Dr. Linda Papadopoulos said that people who have been locked down for two months unable to see friends or family “will see it as progress and a welcome development.”

However, the proposal is completely unenforceable without draconian state monitoring and surveillance.

“From a psychological perspective, I am not sure that it works at all,” said Rory Sutherland, a behavioral scientist and vice chairman of the advertising agency Ogilvy. “Any group assembling could simply claim that everyone present was part of the same cluster, and without spectacular levels of bureaucracy, it would be impossible to establish the veracity of this. It would re-establish the sight of large groups of people as a norm.”

“I think it falls into that category of “excellent science, bad policy,” he added.

And that’s where the tracking app comes in.

“Do not worry about the enforcement of these bubbles; the government could use smartphone app(s) to track and trace bubble violaters,”writes Zero Hedge.

It’s easy to envisage a not too distant dystopia of state-enforced social distancing where the mandatory app will deduct points from your social credit score if you venture outside of your house once too often or meet with an unauthorized friend.

By giving people the ‘privilege’ of allowing them to see a select number of friends, people are also being trained that they are getting rights back.

In reality, this is prison training. Those who show sufficiant obedience to what are essentially totalitarian powers are then given a pat on the head and allowed out into the community in a limited fashion.

Orwell rolls in his grave.

Source: Government Could Enforce Who You’re Allowed To Socialize With Via Tracking App

Coronavirus Isn’t Nearly as Deadly as We Thought. So Why Did the Lockdowns Happen in the First Place? — Christian Research Network

Fauci justified the lockdowns by citing estimated death rates of 3.4 percent and 2 percent. Yet the less than 1 percent death rates have come after funeral home directors blew the whistle on the intentional inflation of coronavirus death counts.”

(Tyler O’Neil – PJ Media)  Recent studies have shown that the coronavirus has spread much faster than previously thought and that it is far less deadly than previously thought. Antibody tests show rapid spread, while many studies have placed the death toll at less than 1 percent….

Swiss Policy Research study put the rate between 0.1 percent and 0.4 percent. The coronavirus is still a serious pandemic, but these numbers cast grave doubt on the wisdom of temporarily shutting down economies. In fact, they raise the question of why Americans ever thought the virus was deadly enough to enter lockdown.

Dennis Prager has argued that the lockdowns may be the “greatest mistake in history.” He noted that the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) warned that 260 million people will face starvation in 2020, double the number from last year. WFP Director David Beasley warned about “a hunger pandemic caused by the Coronavirus. There is also a real danger that more people could potentially die from the economic impact of COVID-19 than from the virus itself.” View article →

via Coronavirus Isn’t Nearly as Deadly as We Thought. So Why Did the Lockdowns Happen in the First Place? — Christian Research Network

Karl Marx: “Accuse Your Enemy of What You Are Doing, As You Are Doing it to Create Confusion”

Absolute Truth from the Word of God


Time to repost this once again……….

Wonder how it is going for Alinsky attempting to organize hell?

A strange thing happens with just one of my articles on Word Press. For no apparent reason, this particular article, which was written in 2017, comes alive again with hundreds of readers.

This has happened numerous times. The article has now been shared over 10,000 times on Facebook.

I have pondered as to why this article, which is about Karl Marx and Saul Alinsky, suddenly begins to be read and shared as if I’d just written it!

But then something dawned on me. Since the day after President Trump astonished the world by beating Hillary Clinton in 2016; the Leftists have been using the Marx/Alinsky tactics. Surely you’ve seen the headlines day after day, accusing our President of collusion with Russia, and insisting that Putin helped President Trump during the election.

And now…

View original post 1,343 more words

Oregon Lockdown Ads: Leaving Home Might Make You A Murderer — Christian Research Network

“The World Health Organization (WHO) and Dr. Anthony Fauci justified the lockdowns by citing estimated death rates of 3.4 percent and 2 percent. Yet the less than 1 percent death rates have come after funeral home directors blew the whistle on the intentional inflation of coronavirus death counts.”

(Tyler O’Neil – PJ Media)  Recent studies have shown that the coronavirus has spread much faster than previously thought and that it is far less deadly than previously thought. Antibody tests show rapid spread, while many studies have placed the death toll at less than 1 percent….

Swiss Policy Research study put the rate between 0.1 percent and 0.4 percent. The coronavirus is still a serious pandemic, but these numbers cast grave doubt on the wisdom of temporarily shutting down economies. In fact, they raise the question of why Americans ever thought the virus was deadly enough to enter lockdown.

Dennis Prager has argued that the lockdowns may be the “greatest mistake in history.” He noted that the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) warned that 260 million people will face starvation in 2020, double the number from last year. WFP Director David Beasley warned about “a hunger pandemic caused by the Coronavirus. There is also a real danger that more people could potentially die from the economic impact of COVID-19 than from the virus itself.” View article →

via Oregon Lockdown Ads: Leaving Home Might Make You A Murderer — Christian Research Network

Newt Gingrich: Pelosi’s crazy $3T coronavirus spending bill may have secret purpose – Don’t underestimate her — Christian Research Network

“After spending days trying to figure out why she would lead her party into such an exposed position, let me offer this three-part proposition.”

(Newt Gingrich – Fox News)  When House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the $3 trillion coronavirus spending bill she and her allies had written – a bill passed by House Democrats Friday night with only a single Republican vote in support – my first reaction was that it would be dead on arrival in the Senate and that the move made no sense.

The bill is the most expensive spending bill ever passed in the history of the House of Representatives, but Pelosi took no public comment, no Republican input, and didn’t consult with the Republican-controlled Senate or the White House on the bill.

As we learned about the nuttier parts of the bill after it was introduced, it struck me almost as a joke. View article →

via Newt Gingrich: Pelosi’s crazy $3T coronavirus spending bill may have secret purpose – Don’t underestimate her — Christian Research Network