Christian Biblical Counsel: LONELINESS

Background

Loneliness is the painful realization that we lack meaningful and close relationships with others. This lack leads to emptiness, melancholy, isolation, and even despair. A sense of rejection and a low self-image are present because we can’t relate, or we feel left out and unwanted, no matter how hard we try to belong.

The kind of society we live in can contribute to loneliness. It is difficult for some to maintain a strong identity and meaningful relationships amid what seems to be a jungle of bureaucracy, specialization, regimentation, and competition. Mobility and constant change tend to make some individuals feel rootless and disconnected.

Loneliness can be self-inflicted. Some people find it difficult to communicate with others or lack confidence because they have a poor self-image. Others yearn for togetherness, yet their demand for privacy and independence inhibits the development of meaningful ties with others. The fear of exposure of their inner selves results in a kind of social paralysis.

One of the results of the Fall is that humankind became alienated from God. This alienation caused Adam and Eve to hide from God and to try to cover up their sin. It is only as we find forgiveness in Christ that we are relieved of the loneliness resulting from this alienation from God. The psalmist exulted in God’s work in his life by writing, “He restores my soul” (Psalm 23:3). This restoration removes the causes of our alienation: “Once you were alienated from God and were enemies in your minds because of your evil behavior. But now he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation” (Colossians 1:21–22, NIV).

Our restoration to fellowship with God also involves our being indwelt by God’s Holy Spirit: “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?”

(1 Corinthians 6:19, NIV). Thus, we are complete in Him: “And you are complete in Him, who is the head of all principality and power” (Colossians 2:10).

 

Helping Strategy

Only when our fellowship with God has been restored can we experience full fellowship with our fellow humans. Whether dealing with Christians or nonbelievers, the helper must approach the problem of loneliness from this perspective.

 

For the Lonely Non-Christian:

1. Offer a word of encouragement. In sharing his or her problem of loneliness, the inquirer is admitting a need. This is important in solving any problem in life. Offer reassurance that this first important step can lead to a satisfactory solution.

2. Try to determine the causes of the person’s loneliness. If not enough information is forthcoming, ask relevant questions: Where does the caller live? Who are his or her neighbors? Where does he or she work? Is the job satisfactory? What about hobbies, friendships, church, etc.?

3. Determine whether the caller has ever received Christ as Savior. Explain the gospel – Christian Biblical Counsel: STEPS TO PEACE WITH GOD. The first step in God’s plan for the person’s life can be realized only by receiving Christ, and that first step should also take care of much of the alienation he or she feels. He or she will be at peace with God (Romans 5:1) and will have Christ as a constant friend: “There is a friend who sticks closer than a brother” (Proverbs 18:24).

4. Suggest seeking spiritual growth by reading and studying the Bible and learning to pray. Offer initial help with Bible study – Your New Life In Christ Bible Study

. The daily exercise of prayer will do much to diminish lingering feelings of aloneness, as it provides immediate access to God, who is “a very present help in trouble” (Psalm 46:1).

5. Recommend seeking a relationship with a Bible-teaching church where warmth of fellowship and opportunities for worship and service can be found. Advise that he or she must not expect too much too quickly. Meaningful relationships do not develop overnight; they must be cultivated, and this takes time. The more the lonely person gives, the more he or she will receive from others: “A man who has friends must himself be friendly” (Proverbs 18:24). Explain that some churches have a singles fellowship, if this should be of interest.

6. Advise the person to strengthen any home ties that may not be all they should be. Communication with other members of the family will do much to develop mutual respect and caring. Now that he or she knows Christ, the salvation of family members should be a primary concern.

7. Pray for spiritual growth and the development of meaningful relationships with both Christian and non-Christian friends.

 

For the Lonely Christian:

1. Encourage the inquirer to develop a daily quiet time. A sense of God’s never-failing presence will help diminish feelings of loneliness. As we grow in this devotional relationship with God, we begin to change. The attitudes of loving and caring which gradually develop become the basis for contacts with others and for the deepening of friendships.

2. Recommend seeking a meaningful place of service in an active Bible teaching church. Focusing on the needs of others will put our problems into perspective and make them seem a little less important. Service

helps us cultivate relationships with other Christians who serve, and tends to increase our self-esteem as we become a part of the group.

3. Suggest strengthening family ties. Lonely people often have some “loose ends” in regard to family relationships. Constant efforts to communicate with our own family—learning to share, to respect and care, to become a part of each other—will do much to prevent loneliness. Improved relationships at home will always lead to improvement elsewhere.

4. Encourage the inquirer to seek counsel from a local pastor, preferably his or her own. A pastor can help the person develop relationships and can recommend areas of service through the church.

 

Scripture

“I waited patiently for the Lord; and He inclined to me, and heard my cry. He also brought me up out of a horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock, and established my steps. He has put a new song in my mouth—Praise to our God; many will see it and fear, and will trust in the Lord. Blessed is that man who makes the Lord his trust, and does not respect the proud, nor such as turn aside to lies. Many, O Lord my God, are Your wonderful works which You have done; and Your thoughts which are toward us cannot be recounted to You in order; if I would declare and speak of them, they are more than can be numbered” (Psalm 40:1–5).

“Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light” (Matthew 11:28–30).

“Lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:20).

“God is faithful, by whom you were called into the fellowship of His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord” (1 Corinthians 1:9).

“He Himself has said, ‘I will never leave you nor forsake you.’ So we may boldly say: ‘The Lord is my helper; I will not fear. What can man do to me?’” (Hebrews 13:5–6).

 

Other suggested Scriptures:

Proverbs 3:5–6

The Billy Graham Christian Worker’s Handbook; World Wide Publications, 1984, 1996

Loneliness

How to Be Alone but Not Lonely

by June Hunt

After gathering up torn ribbon and piles of ripped Christmas wrapping, the young mother carried trash out to a back alley. Their traditional Christmas morning had been cut short when her three children said, “Hurry up, Mom! We have to be at Dad’s by 10:00 this morning.” At the beep of his horn, all three raced out the door to repeat the gift-giving scene with their father, his new wife and her two children. They would be there all day and then leave on a trip for the holidays. Suddenly, both house and heart felt alone and desolate. She sat on the warm hearth of the fireplace allowing tears of emotion to run free. Then with an overwhelming sense of loneliness, she cried out to God.

“Hear my prayer, O Lord, listen to my cry for help; be not deaf to my weeping.”

(Psalm 39:12)

I.     DEFINITIONS

Interestingly, the word alone appears 118 times in Scripture, but rarely is it synonymous with the word lonely. In fact, “the noun ‘loneliness’ did not acquire its present meaning until this century, and did not appear in any major dictionary until after the Second World War. In other words, loneliness has only recently been thought of as a mental condition.” It doesn’t take long in the classroom of life to learn that you can experience loneliness even when surrounded by a crowd. But aloneness is much different. Properly used, it can be a doorway to God. Jesus made a distinction between the two concepts when He said,

“You will leave me all alone. Yet I am not alone, for my Father is with me.”

(John 16:32)

A. What Is Loneliness?

•     The Old Testament Hebrew word for “lonely” is shamem, which means “to be desolate.”

•     The New Testament word eremos means “desert places.”

•     Loneliness is the state of sadness that comes from feeling alone, isolated or cut off from others.

•     A person can feel a lack of connection with others even when in their presence.

•     David cried out to the Lord during his times of loneliness.

“Turn to me and be gracious to me, for I am lonely and afflicted.”

(Psalm 25:16)

B. What Does It Mean to Be Alone?

•     The Old Testament Hebrew word translated “alone” is badad, which means “all by oneself.”

•     The New Testament Greek word monos denotes “single, alone, solitary.”

•     To be alone is the state of being solitary, separated from others.

•     Jesus often sought solitude. He separated Himself from others in order to commune alone with the Father.

“After he had dismissed them, he went up on a mountainside by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone.”

(Matthew 14:23)

C. What Is the Difference between Alone and Lonely?

•     Loneliness refers to the emotional … the state of feeling rejected and desolate.

•     Aloneness refers to the physical … the state of being separated from others.

•     Loneliness is usually a negative experience … accompanied by feelings of hopelessness.

•     Aloneness is meant to be a positive experience … a time of creativity and communion with the Lord.

D. Biblical Examples of Loneliness

David felt lonely because of rejection.

“Look to my right and see; no one is concerned for me. I have no refuge; no one cares for my life.”

(Psalm 142:4)

Job felt lonely because of unfaithful friends.

“A despairing man should have the devotion of his friends, even though he forsakes the fear of the Almighty. But my brothers are as undependable as intermittent streams.”

(Job 6:14–15)

Elijah felt lonely because he feared Jezebel’s anger.

“Elijah was afraid and ran for his life. When he came to Beersheba in Judah, he left his servant there, while he himself went a day’s journey into the desert. He came to a broom tree, sat down under it and prayed that he might die. ‘I have had enough, Lord,’ he said. ‘Take my life; I am no better than my ancestors.’ ”

(1 Kings 19:3–4)

E. Biblical Examples of Being Alone

Paul was alone because of desertion.

“At my first defense, no one came to my support, but everyone deserted me. May it not be held against them. But the Lord stood at my side and gave me strength, so that through me the message might be fully proclaimed and all the Gentiles might hear it.”

(2 Timothy 4:16–17)

Job was alone because he was separated from family and friends.

“He has alienated my brothers from me; my acquaintances are completely estranged from me.”

(Job 19:13)

Jonah was alone because he ran from God.

“He said: ‘In my distress I called to the Lord, and he answered me. From the depths of the grave I called for help, and you listened to my cry. You hurled me into the deep, into the very heart of the seas, and the currents swirled about me; all your waves and breakers swept over me. I said, “I have been banished from your sight; yet I will look again toward your holy temple.” The engulfing waters threatened me, the deep surrounded me; seaweed was wrapped around my head. To the roots of the mountains I sank down; the earth beneath barred me in forever. But you brought my life up from the pit, O Lord my God.’ ”

(Jonah 2:2–6)

Jacob was alone wrestling with God.

“Jacob was left alone, and a man wrestled with him till daybreak.”

(Genesis 32:24)

F.  Who Are the Lonely?

Anyone in any situation can be lonely. Because you have been created to have a relationship with God and with others, you become especially vulnerable when you encounter rejection or experience a significant loss. No one escapes feelings of loneliness. But God allows these feelings to enter our lives in the desire that we will turn our hearts toward Him. Feelings of loneliness are often experienced as a result of …

•     death of a spouse

•     death of a family member

•     personal terminal illness

•     singleness

•     being elderly

•     joblessness

•     a major move

•     divorce

•     separation

•     handicap

•     teenagers going to college

•     empty nest

•     failure of any kind

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.”

(Psalm 62:5)

II.    CHARACTERISTICS OF LONELINESS

Feelings of loneliness are easier to describe than to define. Loneliness is a feeling of emptiness in the pit of your stomach when someone you love has deserted you and you feel no one really cares anymore. You feel unwanted or unneeded. You can feel as if you’re all by yourself though you’re surrounded by people. You may experience loneliness and feel isolated even in the midst of a crowd. You begin to feel you have nothing to live for. It eats away at your inner person. It saps your strength. It robs you of hope. Loneliness puts a wall around you no matter how free you may be. Psalm 31:9–12 describes David when he was seeking the face of the Lord in the midst of extreme loneliness.

“Be merciful to me, O Lord, for I am in distress; my eyes grow weak with sorrow, my soul and my body with grief. My life is consumed by anguish and my years by groaning; my strength fails because of my affliction, and my bones grow weak. Because of all my enemies, I am the utter contempt of my neighbors; I am a dread to my friends—those who see me on the street flee from me. I am forgotten by them as though I were dead; I have become like broken pottery.”

(Psalm 31:9–12)

Physical Symptoms

•     headaches

•     gastrointestinal problems

•     high blood pressure

•     erratic sleeping habits

•     irregular eating habits

III.   CAUSES FOR LONELINESS

Loneliness … even the word sounds painful, bringing up unhappy memories from the past. Were you the one teased about your looks in childhood or the only one without a date to the senior prom? Maybe your best friend moved to a different city or your dad moved out of the house when you were young. Everyone struggles with feelings of loneliness, for no one escapes separation, loss, grief, isolation and the human need for relationships. “We were created to live in partnership with each other and with God. The story of Adam and Eve indicates they were partners in relationship to each other, creation and their Creator.… as Paul wrote, ‘None of us lives to himself and none of us dies to himself.’ In life and death, we long for human community.”

“For none of us lives to himself alone and none of us dies to himself alone.”

(Romans 14:7)

A. Situational Causes

Q  “When is loneliness most likely to occur?”

Loneliness occurs most often when a major change in life occurs. Loss of both the comforting support of loved ones and the security of the old and familiar is resisted by most of us.

“My God, my God, why have you forsaken me? Why are you so far from saving me, so far from the words of my groaning?” (Psalm 22:1)

CHANGE

Circumstances     singleness, divorce, death of a loved one, empty nest, loss of job

Holidays               unfulfilled expectations, not with family or friends, loss of spouse

Affliction             physical handicap, chronic or terminal illness, getting older

Naivety                 exposure to responsibilities previously done by another

Guilt                     fear of intimacy, escape by becoming a workaholic

Estrangement      absence of intimacy, being rejected or rejecting others, removal from customary environment

B. Spiritual Causes

Q  “Why does God seem so distant when I’m lonely?”

To feel deep loneliness when you experience a difficult loss or change in your life is natural. But if you indulge in self-pity and become angry at God for your circumstances, you will begin to feel estranged from Him and will fail to receive His loving comfort.

“Turn to me and be gracious to me, for I am lonely and afflicted.” (Psalm 25:16)

“God has said, ‘Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.’ ” (Hebrews 13:5)

Self-worth           failure to recognize your God-given value and worth

Independence       seeking to escape the pain of loneliness in your own way instead of seeking God

Neglect                 failure to cultivate your relationship with God and others

C. Root Cause

Your longing to belong is natural because God has placed within each of us a basic need for relationship with Himself and others. Don’t seek to dull the pain of loneliness by finding substitutes to fill the void. Instead of placing your focus on your personal need, refocus on your relationship with Christ.

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him. He alone is my rock and my salvation.”

(Psalm 62:5–6)

Wrong Belief:

“I must have the love and acceptance of others to feel significant and to fulfill my need to belong.”

“You have taken from me my closest friends and have made me repulsive to them. I am confined and cannot escape.” (Psalm 88:8)

Right Belief:

I desire to have meaningful relationships with others, but as I cultivate a real intimacy with the Lord, I will realize that I am never alone. Only then can I move toward others with love regardless of their responses toward me.

“Where can I go from your Spirit? Where can I flee from your presence? If I go up to the heavens, you are there; if I make my bed in the depths, you are there. If I rise on the wings of the dawn, if I settle on the far side of the sea, even there your hand will guide me, your right hand will hold me fast.” (Psalm 139:7–10)

IV.  STEPS TO SOLUTION

His yard had always been the prettiest on the block … always watered and well manicured. You had known he was active and their children had fun because of the jeeps, boats, golf carts and motor homes that maneuvered in and out of the driveway. Usually she had been outside too, working in the yard or watching the grandchildren play on a swing in the old oak tree. But only an old pickup truck sits in the drive these days. Now he sits inside in his favorite chair—tuning the TV to fight his loneliness day after day. Only time could have changed this scene.… The old oak is gone and his wife is gone too.… Death has left its sting!

“The Lord God said, ‘It is not good for … man to be alone.’ ”

(Genesis 2:18)

A. Key Verses to Memorize

“Where can I go from your Spirit? Where can I flee from your presence? If I go up to the heavens, you are there. If I make my bed in the depths, you are there.”

(Psalm 139:7–8)

B. Key Passage to Read and Reread

“O God, you are my God, earnestly I seek you; my soul thirsts for you, my body longs for you, in a dry and weary land where there is no water. I have seen you in the sanctuary and beheld your power and your glory. Because your love is better than life, my lips will glorify you. I will praise you as long as I live, and in your name I will lift up my hands. My soul will be satisfied as with the richest of foods; with singing lips my mouth will praise you. On my bed I remember you; I think of you through the watches of the night. Because you are my help, I sing in the shadow of your wings. My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me.”

(Psalm 63:1–8)

C. Questions and Answers

Even as you learn to walk with the Lord as your constant companion, there will be times of loneliness. The following questions and answers may help you when you are lonely.

Question:

“My life is active and full. Why do I get lonely?”

Answer:

Activity alone is no cure for loneliness. Involvement in activities can be an attempt to numb the longing in your heart for God.

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him. He alone is my rock and my salvation; he is my fortress, I will not be shaken.” (Psalm 62:5–6)

Question:

“How do I deal with the guilt of feeling lonely when I have Christ in my heart?”

Answer:

It’s not sin to experience the pain of loneliness. We are made to have significant relationships with God and with others. When there is great loss, there is great pain. Even Jesus hurt when His friend Lazarus died. Tears are not wrong; they are God-given.

“Jesus wept.” (John 11:35)

Question:

“My mate is gone. What are the hardest times I will face?”

Answer:

The most emotional times will be holidays, birthdays and anniversaries. Expect a period of grief. Grieving over a significant loss is a healthy and natural part of life.

“[There is] a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance.” (Ecclesiastes 3:4)

Question:

“How can I make it through the holidays?”

Answer:

Make plans to be with others on sentimental, special days.

•     Be with comforting family or friends.

•     Reach out to someone in need.

“Two are better than one, because they have a good return for their work: If one falls down, his friend can help him up. But pity the man who falls and has no one to help him up!” (Ecclesiastes 4:9–10)

Question:

“Does loneliness last forever?”

Answer:

No. One day, when we are with Him, there will be no more loneliness … no more death, no more mourning, no more tears.

“He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.” (Revelation 21:4)

D. Become a Bridge Builder

God has not created us to live in isolation but to have fellowship with others. Building your relationship with the Lord also means building bridges to others.

“For none of us lives to himself alone and none of us dies to himself alone.”

(Romans 14:7)

Be rid of bitterness.

•     Give others the same grace that God gives you.

•     Pray for your enemies and those who have hurt you.

•     Focus on the blessings in your life.

•     Trust your choices to God. He is sovereign.

•     Allow God to handle your hurts and disappointments.

“See to it that no one misses the grace of God and that no bitter root grows up to cause trouble and defile many.” (Hebrews 12:15)

Understand the pain of others.

•     Imagine how you would feel in the same situation.

•     Look for practical ways to help.

•     Don’t be critical.

•     Know that it is by the grace of God that you are not in their situation.

•     Be a good listener.

“I thank God, whom I serve, as my forefathers did, with a clear conscience, as night and day I constantly remember you in my prayers. Recalling your tears, I long to see you, so that I may be filled with joy.” (2 Timothy 1:3–4)

Initiate invitations (calls, visits).

•     Write letters to out-of-town friends and relatives.

•     Invite people to have lunch or dinner with you.

•     Invite people to your home.

•     Offer your home for meetings and social gatherings.

•     Join a committee in your church that welcomes visitors or new members.

•     Initiate calls to people, and ask them how they are doing.

“Then Jesus said to his host, ‘When you give a luncheon or dinner, do not invite your friends, your brothers or relatives, or your rich neighbors; if you do, they may invite you back and so you will be repaid. But when you give a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, and you will be blessed. Although they cannot repay you, you will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.’ ” (Luke 14:12–14)

Look for ways to express love to others.

•     Offer help to someone in need (shop for groceries, prepare a meal, carpool, etc.).

•     Send an encouraging card or note to someone.

•     Help someone complete a task.

•     Give someone a small gift (flowers, cookies, bookmark, etc.) that will communicate God’s love.

•     Perform random acts of kindness without expecting anything in return from the recipient.

“Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” (John 15:13)

Don’t demand that others change.

•     Be flexible.

•     Give others time to grow. Pray for them.

•     Have a heart of love and acceptance for others.

•     Make every attempt for peace.

•     Don’t require perfection from yourself or others.

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.” (Psalm 62:5)

Begin to attend a group Bible study.

•     Find someone to lead a Bible study in your home if you don’t feel comfortable leading one yourself.

•     Join a small group Bible study.

•     Start a weekly group that encourages one another in common areas.

•     Share biblical encouragement for every problem.

“Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but let us encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” (Hebrews 10:25)

Read about Christian role models.

•     Learn how other Christians (pastor, teacher, friends) handle adverse situations.

•     Study the life of Jesus Christ (the Book of Matthew).

•     Read about other role models in Scripture (for example, the story of Joseph in Genesis chapters 37–50 or the Book of Ruth).

•     Read biographies about Christian role models (Corrie ten Boom, Jonathan Edwards).

“You became imitators of us and of the Lord; in spite of severe suffering, you welcomed the message with the joy given by the Holy Spirit. And so you became a model to all the believers in Macedonia and Achaia.” (1 Thessalonians 1:6–7)

Immerse yourself in inspirational music.

•     Listen to Christian radio in your car and home.

•     Guard your ears from listening to spiritually numbing music.

•     Choose your favorite inspirational music from various artists and styles.

“My heart is steadfast, O God, my heart is steadfast; I will sing and make music.” (Psalm 57:7)

Decide to diversify your activities and goals.

•     Give others the opportunity to know you.

•     Be open to change.

•     Participate in new and different activities.

•     Be willing to give up an old activity that is no longer useful or edifying.

•     Pray for God’s direction in choosing your activities.

“Sing to him a new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy.” (Psalm 33:3)

Go to God’s Word.

•     Read your Bible daily.

•     Begin to memorize Bible verses.

•     Look for ways to apply Scripture to your everyday life.

“Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he saved them from their distress. He sent forth his word and healed them; he rescued them from the grave.”

(Psalm 107:19–20)

Expect God to do a new thing.

•     Begin to think about life from a biblical perspective.

•     Leave the past behind.

•     Make a list of the new things God is doing in your life.

•     Give yourself time to adjust to new things.

•     Start a prayer journal.

“Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland.” (Isaiah 43:18–19)

Surrender yourself to the Savior.

“Find rest, O my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.” (Psalm 62:5)

Alone but Not Lonely

You may feel lonely, but you are never   alone! Take comfort in God’s promise that, no matter the circumstances …“The Lord   … will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.”

(Deuteronomy   31:8)

 

Lonely? 
Be rid of bitterness.“See to it   that no one misses the grace of God and that no bitter root grows up to cause   trouble and defile many.” (Hebrews 12:15)

Understand the pain of others.

“I thank God,   whom I serve, as my forefathers did, with a clear conscience, as night and   day I constantly remember you in my prayers. Recalling your tears, I long to   see you, so that I may be filled with joy.” (2 Timothy 1:3–4)

lnitiate invitations.

“When you give   a luncheon or dinner, do not invite your friends, your brothers or relatives,   or your rich neighbors; if you do, they may invite you back and so you will   be repaid. But when you give a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the   lame, the blind, and you will be blessed. Although they cannot repay you, you   will be repaid at the resurrection of the righteous.” (Luke 14:12–14)

Look for ways to love.

“Greater love   has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” (John   15:13)

Don’t demand change.

“Find rest, O   my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.” (Psalm 62:5)

 

Be a Bridge Builder 
Begin group Bible study.“Let us not   give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but let us   encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.”   (Hebrews 10:25)

Read Christian biographies.

“You became   imitators of us and of the Lord; in spite of severe suffering, you welcomed   the message with the joy given by the Holy Spirit. And so you became a model   to all the believers in Macedonia and Achaia.” (1 Thessalonians 1:6–7)

Immerse in praise music.

“My heart is   steadfast, O God, my heart is steadfast; I will sing and make music.” (Psalm   57:7)

Diversify activities.

“Sing to him a   new song; play skillfully, and shout for joy.” (Psalm 33:3)

Go to God’s Word.

“Then they   cried to the Lord in their   trouble, and he saved them from their distress. He sent forth his word and   healed them; he rescued them from the grave.” (Psalm 107:19–20)

Expect a new thing.

“Forget the   former things; do not dwell on the past. See, I am doing a new thing! Now it   springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the desert and   streams in the wasteland.” (Isaiah 43:18–19)

Surrender to the Savior.

“Find rest, O   my soul, in God alone; my hope comes from him.” (Psalm 62:5)

 

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Baker, Don. Lord, I’ve Got a Problem. Eugene, OR: Harvest House, 1988.

Carter, Leslie W., Paul D. Meier, and Frank B. Minirth. Overcoming Loneliness. Grand Rapids: Spire, 2000.

Elliot, Elisabeth. Loneliness. Nashville: Oliver-Nelson, 1988.

Haggai, John. How to Win Over Loneliness. Eugene, OR: Harvest House, 1988.

Hunt, June. Counseling Through Your Bible Handbook. Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers, 2007.

Hunt, June. How to Forgive … When You Don’t Feel Like It. Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers, 2007.

Hunt, June. How to Handle Your Emotions. Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers, 2008.

Hunt, June. Seeing Yourself Through God’s Eyes. Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers, 2008

Ivy, Steven S. The Promise and Pain of Loneliness. Nashville: Broadman, 1989.

Jeremiah, David. Overcoming Loneliness. Rev. ed. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1991.

Mains, Karen Burton. Lonely No More: A Woman’s Journey to Personal, Marital, and Spiritual Healing. Dallas: Word, 1993.

Sanders, J. Oswald. Facing Loneliness: The Starting Point of a New Journey. Grand Rapids: Discovery House, 1990.

Wiersbe, Warren W. Lonely People: Biblical Lessons on Understanding and Overcoming Loneliness. Living Lessons from God’s Word. Grand Rapids: Baker, 2002.[1]


[1] Hunt, J. (2008). Biblical Counseling Keys on Loneliness: How to Be Alone but Not Lonely (1–16). Dallas, TX: Hope For The Heart.

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